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Proper Prepation of Salmon

IMG_3948Salmon is high in Omega-3 fatty acids, which are great for the immune and circulatory systems.

Its Begins with quality.

Salmon may be purchased at a grocery store or fish market. It should still have the skin on to maintain its freshness and moisture. You may buy a whole salmon side, or a fillet that is cut from the thickest part of the fish. Experts suggest a center cut piece of salmon.  Avoid salmon with a strong fishy odor. Look for moist, clean cut fillets.

There are different kinds of salmon.

Salmon may be cooked in different ways.  King Salmon is known for its buttery flavor and texture. It’s the largest salmon species, has the highest Omega-3 and oil concentrations of any salmon.

Sockeye Salmon is more abundant than King Salmon. It has a bright red-orange color and a very rich flavor. It has a high fat and Omega-3 content. Sockeye is the most common salmon you will find in your local grocery store.

Coho Salmon can be found in grocery stores around August and September. It’s flavor has a milder flavor that King and Sockeye salmon.

Chum Salmon is primarily used for canned salmon. It varies greatly in quality and is generally lower in oil than other types of salmon.

Pink Humpback Salmon is the most abundant salmon. It usually is canned or smoked. It has a mild flavor and lighter colored flesh.

Wild versus farmed salmon?

There have been questions about the effects farmed salmon and its effects on the environment. Some activists have concerns that farmed salmon have escaped and carried diseases which effect wild salmon populations. Proponents of wild salmon point out that salmon in the wild have healthier diets than farmed salmon. The healthier diets cause the meat to be better tasting and looking. The recommendations are to speak to your local fishmonger or experts in your market about the pros and cons of wild and farmed salmon.

Wild salmon will also look pinker and brighter than some farmed varieties. A few salmon farmers inject dye into their farmed fish to make them look as pink as the wild salmon.

It has been reported that wild salmon contains more nutrients than farmed salmon, and several studies have been cited showing that farmed salmon contains more polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) than wild salmon.

Skinless Salmon.

Some people prefer to keep the skin on the fish when cooking and eating it.

Place the fillet on a cutting board with the skin side down. Sprinkle one end of the salmon with salt to make the fish less slippery. Hold the salted end of the fish and use a sharp knife to cut between the flesh and the skin slowly, until the fish pulls away from the skin.

Discard the skin or, save it to use in other recipes. Some people enjoy making crispy salmon skin for salads or sushi.

Boneless Salmon.

Use your fingers to remove the bones and pull the bones out of the fish in the direction of the fish’s grain.

Season the salmon.

Salt and pepper can be sprinkled on both sides. Add other herbs such as parsley, dill, tarragon, and garlic to taste. Coat the salmon with olive oil or white wine, and add any other flavors you like, including brown sugar, lemon or butter.

Salmon is one of the tastiest fish in the sea and one of the most healthiest. Salmon is high in Omega-3 fatty acids, which are great for the immune and circulatory systems. Salmon is also good for the heart, and is low in calories and fat compared to other protein sources.

Its Begins with quality.

Salmon may be purchased at a grocery store or fish market. It should still have the skin on to maintain its freshness and moisture. You may buy a whole salmon side, or a fillet that is cut from the thickest part of the fish. Experts suggest a center cut piece of salmon.

Avoid salmon with a strong fishy odor. Look for moist, clean cut fillets.

There are different kinds of salmon.

Salmon may be cooked in different ways.  King Salmon is known for its buttery flavor and texture. It’s the largest salmon species, has the highest Omega-3 and oil concentrations of any salmon.

Sockeye Salmon is more abundant than King Salmon. It has a bright red-orange color and a very rich flavor. It has a high fat and Omega-3 content. Sockeye is the most common salmon you will find in your local grocery store.

Coho Salmon can be found in grocery stores around August and September. It’s flavor has a milder flavor that King and Sockeye salmon.

Chum Salmon is primarily used for canned salmon. It varies greatly in quality and is generally lower in oil than other types of salmon.

Pink Humpback Salmon is the most abundant salmon. It usually is canned or smoked. It has a mild flavor and lighter colored flesh.

Wild versus farmed salmon?

There have been questions about the effects farmed salmon and its effects on the environment. Some activists have concerns that farmed salmon have escaped and carried diseases which effect wild salmon populations. Proponents of wild salmon point out that salmon in the wild have healthier diets than farmed salmon. The healthier diets cause the meat to be better tasting and looking. The recommendations are to speak to your local fishmonger or experts in your market about the pros and cons of wild and farmed salmon.

Wild salmon will also look pinker and brighter than some farmed varieties. A few salmon farmers inject dye into their farmed fish to make them look as pink as the wild salmon.

It has been reported that wild salmon contains more nutrients than farmed salmon, and several studies have been cited showing that farmed salmon contains more polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) than wild salmon.

Skinless Salmon.

Some people prefer to keep the skin on the fish when cooking and eating it.

Place the fillet on a cutting board with the skin side down. Sprinkle one end of the salmon with salt to make the fish less slippery. Hold the salted end of the fish and use a sharp knife to cut between the flesh and the skin slowly, until the fish pulls away from the skin.

Discard the skin or, save it to use in other recipes. Some people enjoy making crispy salmon skin for salads or sushi.

Boneless Salmon.

Use your fingers to remove the bones and pull the bones out of the fish in the direction of the fish’s grain.

Season the salmon.

Sprinkle salt and pepper on both sides. Add herbs,  such as parsley, dill, tarragon, and garlic to taste. Coat the salmon with olive oil or white wine, and any other flavors you like.

 

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